Tag Archives: Line of Scrimmage

Discussion: 3-Point Stance

17 Jul

 

160716 - 3rd Combine13

There’s some disagreement about what constitutes a “proper” three-point stance. Some coaches want a little air under the heels of the player, while others prefer the player have his feet rooted into the ground to form a solid base, especially if that payer will be asked to move in different directions. Some want some weight out over the extended hand, while others will argue to have no weight on it at all.  What is certain is that a three-point stance for an offensive lineman is – and should be – different than it is for a defensive lineman, because what is expected of them is different, especially if that D-lineman is in a 1-gap scheme.

The 3-point for an offensive lineman is pretty much determined by the type of offense they’re operating in. If that O-lineman will be asked to drop (or kick-slide) into pass protection, or bucket step to execute a trap or wrap blocking assignment, or flat step to combo block a D-lineman to linebacker depth then you don’t want him aligned with weight out over his hand and his butt jacked up. Because as soon as he picks up that extended hand, gravity will force him to take a false first-step to prevent him from falling forward. That step will have little or no power behind it and rarely, if ever, will be directional. The defense wins.

Continue reading

The Battles Along the Line of Scrimmage

13 Jul

 

OL battle (hectorir)

Football is conflict.  This conflict is no more evident — or violent — than in the battle along the line of scrimmage where strength and positioning — what coaches call “leverage” — often determines the winner.  Here there are no Davids here; there are only Goliaths.

That which separates the combatants is essentially a DMZ.  It is a swath of turf called the neutral zone.  No one, except the offensive center, can intrude upon this sacred ground and him only because he must handle the ball to snap it.  In terms of dimensions, it is as wide as the ball is long.  Each tip of the ball is a coordinate in a separate line of scrimmage that stretches from sideline to sideline: one for the defense, and one for the offense.

Continue reading

Offensive Tactic: Selling the Nine

22 Mar

action3 (wisconsinfansite.com)In a pass play, receivers run along specific, predesigned paths that attack the “open grass” — or soft spots — in a defense.  These paths are called “routes” and a carefully crafted mixture of them is called a “pass pattern” or “concept”.

The “9” is football’s most basic and most important pass route and, yet, it’s nothing more than a race to the end zone – or at least as far as the quarterback can throw.

Selling the nine is convincing a defensive back that he’s in that race every time a receiver releases from the line of scrimmage.

The nine — also called a “Go” or “Fly” route — is basically a straight line.  As such, it serves as the stem for many other pass routes a receiver can run.  By stem, we refer to another straight line, the one a receiver runs when he escapes the line of scrimmage and races to the breakpoint of his assigned route.

Continue reading

Defensive Tactic: Backside Contain

21 Mar

backside contain1

The backside of any defense is where, initially, the ball isn’t going.  Backside contain is protection for those times when an offensive play – like a reverse, or counter, or bootleg – changes direction and attacks what was, initially, the defense’s backside.

Like containment on the frontside of a play, backside contain is about keeping the ball-carrier bottled up in the backfield and allowing the pursuit from the interior defenders to catch him before he breaks “outside” into the perimeter where the defense is weakest.

Continue reading