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Why Football Matters. . .

18 Jul

160718 - Jim Harbaugh

by John Harbaugh
Head Football Coach
Baltimore Ravens

The game of football is under attack.

We see it every day in the headlines and on the news. The medical concerns are pressing. The game has taken its share of criticism. President Barack Obama said that if he had boys he wouldn’t let them play football. Even LeBron James has publicly said no football in his house.

The question is asked over and over:  Why would anyone want to play football? And why would anyone let their kids play?

Here’s my answer: I believe there’s practically no other place where a young man is held to a higher standard.

 

Football is hard. It’s tough. It demands discipline. It teaches obedience. It builds character.

Football is a metaphor for life.

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Great Coaches: Bud Wilkinson

22 Mar

 

Bud1Before he entered coaching, he briefly worked for his father’s mortgage company. But the lure of coaching football was too powerful, so Wilkinson became an assistant coach at Syracuse and then back at Minnesota. During World War II he served on an aircraft carrier with the U.S. Navy, and also coached a Navy football team at Iowa Preflight Academy, a school designed to prepare its students to enter Naval flight school.

faurot1 - at the  chalknoard

Dan Faurot at the chalkboard.

At Iowa Preflight, Wilkinson met and coached with Jim Tatum in 1946 where he learned the intricacies of Dan Faurot’s Split-T offense.  When Tatum was hired as the head football coach at the University of Oklahoma. Wilkinson followed Tatum to Norman, and after just one season, Tatum left the Sooners for Maryland. The 30-year-old Wilkinson was named head coach (and athletic director) and would soon make history with the option offense Farout had created and, with the aid of Gomer Jones,  his defensive coordinator, he would devise the 5-2 Defense, which became widely used by colleges and high schools and was simply known as the “Okie” defense.

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